Dr Robin Russell-Jones on BBC Radio London

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BBC Radio London 10 September 2018 interview with Dr Robin Russell-Jones on London air pollution:

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Climate change – the Brexit threat

theObserver

The Observer, 9 September 2018:

There is a tacky interface between industry and government when it comes to public health or the environment, and it is abundantly clear that Brexit is fatally shifting the balance towards deregulation (“Green watchdog will lack bite after Brexit”, News).

It is no coincidence that the most prominent Brexiters are also climate change deniers because they perceive climate change legislation as a major threat to industrial profit. This is the reason that the Department of Energy and Climate Change was dissolved, the reason that climate change has been omitted from the remit of the government’s new green watchdog, and the reason that Brexiters fulminate against the Climate Change Act.

The ruinous aspect of their delusion is that climate change offers huge opportunities to UK businesses that invest in energy efficiency, clean energy or ultra-low emission transport, as these new technologies can then be exported, something that Brexiters are apparently keen to promote. Instead, the government has scrapped zero-carbon buildings, abandoned the tidal barrage in Swansea Bay and frozen the fuel escalator, thus encouraging the rapid growth of diesel vehicles.

The chancellor boasted that this had saved motorists £47bn over the past seven years. Unfortunately, air pollution has cost the NHS £140bn over the same period and 280,000 premature deaths. How tragic that Brexit generates politicians of such limited vision who can only look backwards.

Dr Robin Russell-Jones
Chair, Help Rescue the Planet
Marlow, Bucks

Car industry has no right to bemoan pollution fee

financialTimes

Financial Times, 5 September 2018:

It’s a bit rich for car manufacturers and their suppliers to complain about Birmingham’s pollution charge when those same car manufacturers lobbied European governments to promote diesel and then rigged laboratory tests (“Birmingham businesses hit at pollution charge”, September 3).

Evidence of the harmful effects of air pollution is accumulating rapidly with a recent study from China showing cognitive deficits in adults exposed to high levels of nitrogen dioxide and particulates. Even more disturbing is a study from New York of non-smoking women where exposure to particulates during pregnancy was associated with mental health problems.

Birmingham residents, including car workers, should be grateful to their council for addressing an urgent public health issue on which the national Government has abdicated responsibility.

Robin Russell-Jones
Former chair, Campaign for Lead Free Air, Marlow, Bucks, UK

 

Battle to clean up the air we breathe

theGuardian

The Guardian, 1 September 2018:

The link between cognitive performance and air pollution is very worrying but not surprising (High pollution levels ‘causing huge reduction in intelligence’, 28 August). The report by the Royal College of Physicians in 2016 drew a link between air pollution and dementia in the elderly and reduced cognitive performance in children. This recent study from China indicates that teenagers and adults are also affected.

We don’t know how these effects are mediated, but with neurotoxins such as lead the most critical period of exposure is likely to be during pregnancy. A study undertaken in New York of non-smoking mothers showed strong associations with foetal exposure to particulates and subsequent mental health problems in those children at primary school age. These problems included anxiety, depression and ADHD. This has momentous implications for public health. We are suffering an epidemic of mental health problems among British schoolchildren which the medical profession is unable to explain. There is an urgent need for further research in this area, but I am not aware of any study in the UK that addresses this problem.

Dr Robin Russell-Jones
Former chair, Campaign for Lead Free Air